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California Pregnancy Centers Forced to Promote Abortion Will Have Their Day in High Court

A judge in Riverside County, California, ruled earlier this month that the so-called Reproductive FACT Act violates the state constitution’s freedom of speech protection by forcing pregnancy centers to promote a message — one that’s also contrary to their mission.

The law compels licensed pregnancy centers to display a notice reminding women that they may opt to kill their unborn babies and do so for “free” or at low cost.

Judge Gloria Trask issued a permanent injunction against the law.

Other pro-life pregnancy centers sued the state and lost in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. But the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear their case. From Alliance Defending Freedom:

Millions of Americans do not accept or endorse California’s view of abortion. And they shouldn’t accept the state’s blatant ignorance of constitutionally protected free speech either. In fact, ADF has recently been involved in cases where laws that are similar to California’s have been struck down or partially invalidated in Texas, Maryland, and New York City, and we are fighting one in Illinois as well.

The government simply has no business attempting to control the ideology of its citizens through the coercion of private businesses. Pro-life pregnancy centers exist to offer help and hope to pregnant women in need. And in a free society, they must retain the freedom to operate according to their mission without fear of government punishment.

The Supreme Court should strike down California’s terrible law and ensure that in America, the government is never allowed to force anyone to promote abortion or anything else that violates their conscience.

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