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North Carolina Lawmakers Vote to Protect Privacy — Then This Happened

Lawmakers attempt to protect the privacy, safety, and modesty of constituents who care about such things by deferring to common sense: men use men’s restrooms, and women use women’s restrooms.

But the tide has turned in America, for the worse. The city council in Charlotte, North Carolina, passed an ordinance to allow men pretending to be women to use women’s intimate and private facilities. The Christian News Network reported that a coalition of pastors and others who opposed the ordinance signed a petition against it. The city council passed the ordinance by a vote of seven to four.

The Republican-controlled legislature held an emergency session to overturn what would have placed the confused desires of a few over the privacy of many. The bill to overturn passed, and Gov. Pat McCrory signed it into law.

“Public agencies shall require every multiple occupancy bathroom or changing facility to be designated for and only used by persons based on their biological sex,” the legislation reads in part. “Local boards of education shall require every multiple occupancy bathroom or changing facility that is designated for student use to be designated for and used only by students based on their biological sex.”

Liberals in power and businesses typically threaten to boycott cities and states that pass laws to protect privacy. The mayor of San Francisco, for example, has banned non-essential government travel to North Carolina. Gov. McCrory, who last year vetoed a religious exemption bill (though the legislature overrode the veto) for magistrates and court officials who oppose homosexual “marriage,” signed this bill into law. 

“The basic expectation of privacy in the most personal of settings, a restroom or locker room, for each gender was violated by government overreach and intrusion by the mayor and city council of Charlotte,” he said in a statement. “As a result, I have signed legislation passed by a bipartisan majority to stop this breach of basic privacy and etiquette which was to go into effect April 1.”

 

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