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WATCH: Hidden Camera Just Destroyed One Of The BIGGEST Lies About Guns In America

Political commentator Steven Crowder decided to put President Obama’s claim about the ease of obtaining firearms without a background check through the so-called “gun show loophole” to the test by going to a show with a hidden camera.

Crowder soon discovered the president is not being honest with the American people.

Crowder incorporated some of the undercover footage he shot into a video published earlier this week on the subject. Crowder said he traveled specifically to a gun show in Crown Point, Indiana — just over the Illinois border and about an hour’s drive from Obama’s home town of Chicago.

As he often does, the president recently used the Windy City as a case-in-point of the need for greater gun control in the United States. Chicago has one of the highest murder rates as well as some of the strictest gun control laws in the country.

Included in Crowder’s video is footage from CNN’s town hall on guns earlier this month, where Obama argued that Chicago’s gun control laws are not as effective as they should be because people can travel to nearby Indiana, where laws are not as strict, to get their firearms.

“They go to a gun show in Indiana, where right now they don’t have to do a background check. Load up a van and open up that van and sell them to kids and gangs in Chicago,” the president said.

Crowder found Obama’s statement was false. He went from seller to seller at the Crown Point show and could not find anyone who would sell him a gun without first requiring a background check.

That’s because dealers, even when selling at gun shows, must perform the check.

Crowder tried to coax dealers into making a sale through cash offers but none would take the bait. “That’s a felony and 20 years, and I’m not going to mess with it,” one dealer said. Another pointed out the mere act of trying to convince a gun dealer to sell without a check is a felony.

Crowder also had the same results when he went to another gun show and individual stores at different locations in Indiana.

As reported by Western Journalism, the CNN town hall is not the first time the president has been caught misrepresenting the nature of current gun laws in the United States. In an address announcing his executive actions concerning gun control earlier this month, Obama said violent felons can go online and buy weapons “with no background check, no questions asked.”

Gun-rights advocate and radio talk show host Dana Loesch and several others were quick to call out Obama on his false claim. “The President is outright lying about online purchases,” Loesch tweeted during his speech, and even linked to an article which explained:

Background checks already exist for purchases made online…When you purchase guns online they aren’t shipped to your house like an Amazon delivery. They must be shipped to a FFL [Federal Firearms Licensed dealer] where you then go, fill out a 4473 [Firearm Transaction Record], get your background check, and if cleared you can take it home. Period. This law already exists.

You cannot carry a firearm, much less purchase one, if you are a prohibited possessor be it at a store, gun show, or Internet. Period. It’s already regulated.

The “universal background checks” the president ultimately seeks would make the transfer of firearms between private individuals through sale, trade, gift or inheritance subject to federal law, and therefore criminal prosecution.

Critics have pointed out none of the changes Obama wants would have prevented any of the mass shootings in recent years including Sandy Hook, Charleston, Chattanooga, Oregon or San Bernardino.

Townhall reported a University of Chicago study found criminals, by-in-large and not surprisingly, avoid obtaining guns through legal means.

BCN editor’s note: This article first appeared at Western Journalism.

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