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WATCH: Here’s Why Black Millennials Aren’t Buying the Racism-Behind-Every-Rock Narrative

Star Parker, founder and president of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, spoke with Fox News’s Tucker Carlson, who asked her why should blacks, who vote overwhelmingly for Democrats, rethink that loyalty.

Blacks have been loyal to the Democratic party “because they’ve bought this idea of an activist government, but something very exciting is happening now with Trump in office.” The president’s administration is focusing on urban communities and initiatives. But something else exciting is happening. Black millennials don’t buy the “racism-behind-every-rock narrative” and “they’re individualists.”

Liberals won’t like the comparison Star made between the Congressional Black Caucus and people who were part of a historical American institution. Watch the brief clip for more and tell us if you agree.

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4 comments

  1. I can vote for the political party that offers nothing but open borders, hate, and the expansion of big government; the party that chases women from restaurants and screams at widows whose husbands died for their country, … Or

    I can vote Republican. It’s a very simple choice for me – and I’m choosing Jobs over Mobs.

  2. Star, please be careful what you may ask for. A charismatic African American politician could easily use the #WalkAway and “BlaxEt” memes to shift Black votes away from both the Democratic and Republican parties.

    • I don’t think so. Charismatic Black politicians, false prophets, and opportunists have always been around. I believe once a person starts reevaluating the choices they’ve been makeing and whether they’ve been beneficial or not and deciding they don’t have to follow the crowd, that they can “be Black their way”, as I like to put it, they’re not going to be so quick to play “follow the leader”!

      I’m a 62-year old Black woman and I voted for one Democrat in my life and that was Jimmy Carter—and that was only because my dad told me to register Democrat and he was the Democratic candidate for President at the time (1976). Well that was it. The Carter Administration cured me from ever voting for another Democrat again. I was convinced their were dangerous and not fit to lead my country. However, I had to keep the fact that I wasn’t a Democrat from my dad for 35 years. Even then, it wasn’t pretty when I “came out” to my dad as a Conservative/American Nationalist. He called me a “traitor” to my race, a “sellout”, told me I was no longer Black and revoked me! I was in my 50’s! By that time I said to myself he’s just going have to get over it. He did—eventually. We decided to not talk about politics when we talked. He’s gone now and I miss him. He was a good man and strong and my folks gave me the greatest gift parents could ever give their children—the ability to love myself, not hate others, to always think for myself and never let what others think about me affect how I feel about me!

      It’s all about God, country, family and pride. Why make life harder than it has to be?

  3. There are so many arguments for why the race card is being shamelessly overplayed and increasingly unsuccessful. Your explanation about the Millennial psyche of individualism was brilliant, Star. They are hardwired to think more freely and will see through phoniness more readily.

    As for the ‘plantation’ analogy re: the CBC, the truth is painful but still true!